Six major issues that dominate public life today and require resolution

By JOHN MENADUE

There are six major issues that dominate public life today and require resolution. Those issues are: the dire consequences following the Iraq invasion, tax cuts during the mining boom that result in continuing budget deficits and debt increases, the threat of climate change and increased carbon pollution, the NBN debacle, hostility to refugees and asylum seekers, and problems with foreign influence and political donations which are producing an anti-Chinese sentiment. Continue reading “Six major issues that dominate public life today and require resolution”

The media are finding Chinese under most rocks

By JOHN MENADUE

The campaign run by some of our security agencies  and people close to them about the alleged Chinese threat is getting great support from some journalists. The latest is Andrew Greene, the  security and defence reporter at the ABC who breathtakingly reported last week that “A Chinese vessel, believed to be a spy ship, docked next to HMAS Adelaide in Fiji”. Good god!

We have had a lot of such misleading stories in recent weeks. Continue reading “The media are finding Chinese under most rocks”

Ignore driverless cars and we’re rejecting the future

By ANTHONY ALBANESE and ED HUSIC

The ever-accelerating pace of change in the 21st century demands that regulators be quick on their feet. Science and technology move so quickly that the moment we’ve settled the regulations governing the latest emerging sector, circumstances change, requiring that we revisit the regulatory framework.

For example, the Internet has developed so quickly over the past two decades that governments have failed to keep pace with emerging problems regarding privacy, bullying and cybercrime.

We should learn from this when it comes to the approach of what will be one of our biggest changes in decades: the emergence of automated vehicles. Continue reading “Ignore driverless cars and we’re rejecting the future”

Ten questions the auDA dissidents won’t answer

By LAURIE PATTON

As I’ve previously written, auDA –the company managing Australia’s Internet domain names – is under attack from a group of dissident members. In an effort to shed some light on the issues at stake I recently posted answers to questions put to CEO Cameron Boardman. In the interest of fairness, I invited the other side to put their case. They have so far declined.

So, for the record, these are the questions to which I sought answers. The invitation to respond here remains open… Continue reading “Ten questions the auDA dissidents won’t answer”

Community TV – needed now more than ever

By LAURIE PATTON

Last week the Government announced a further two year extension on its deadline for community television stations to vacate their free-to-air spectrum. The death knell first rang back in September 2014 when then communications minister Malcolm Turnbull announced that all CTV licences would end in December 2015. Since then the sector has limped on courtesy of a series of last minute reprieves.

Sadly, this was to be too late for TVS (Television Sydney), the station I created back in 2004 with the support of the University of Western Sydney. Continue reading “Community TV – needed now more than ever”

Facts and fiction: More on the auDA situation

By LAURIE PATTON

As we approach the auDA Special General Meeting to be held on 27 July 2018 I decided to throw a few pertinent questions at CEO Cameron Boardman. As I’ve previously written, I simply can’t see how any further public displays of disunity are helping the situation, but it is also important that we decide the future of the organisation based on facts. Continue reading “Facts and fiction: More on the auDA situation”

auDA has great opportunity to reinforce its role in our digitally-enabled future, but needs to understand that disunity is death

By ANNE HURLEY

Having watched with interest the unfolding debate over the future of auDA – the organisation charged with managing the Internet domain name space here on behalf of the federal government – I was delighted to recently be invited to join its new Consultation Model Working Group.

auDA has drawn together a group of 16 members, which includes a broad range of people with knowledge and expertise in the running of the Internet in this country over many years.  Continue reading “auDA has great opportunity to reinforce its role in our digitally-enabled future, but needs to understand that disunity is death”