Setting the record straight about Afilias Australia’s new .au service

By AFILIAS | 5 July 2018

The transition of .au to the new Afilias system in Australia happened last weekend according to plan: no interruption of service to end users and minimal disruption to registrars. By all accounts, this historic event is a testament to auDA’s vision and determination to fulfill the goals of the project. Continue reading “Setting the record straight about Afilias Australia’s new .au service”

The media are finding Chinese under most rocks

By JOHN MENADUE | 13 June 2018

The campaign run by some of our security agencies  and people close to them about the alleged Chinese threat is getting great support from some journalists. The latest is Andrew Greene, the  security and defence reporter at the ABC who breathtakingly reported last week that “A Chinese vessel, believed to be a spy ship, docked next to HMAS Adelaide in Fiji”. Good god!

We have had a lot of such misleading stories in recent weeks. Continue reading “The media are finding Chinese under most rocks”

Ignore driverless cars and we’re rejecting the future

By ANTHONY ALBANESE and ED HUSIC | 12 June 2018

The ever-accelerating pace of change in the 21st century demands that regulators be quick on their feet. Science and technology move so quickly that the moment we’ve settled the regulations governing the latest emerging sector, circumstances change, requiring that we revisit the regulatory framework.

For example, the Internet has developed so quickly over the past two decades that governments have failed to keep pace with emerging problems regarding privacy, bullying and cybercrime.

We should learn from this when it comes to the approach of what will be one of our biggest changes in decades: the emergence of automated vehicles. Continue reading “Ignore driverless cars and we’re rejecting the future”

auDA has great opportunity to reinforce its role in our digitally-enabled future, but needs to understand that disunity is death

By ANNE HURLEY | 27 May 2018

Having watched with interest the unfolding debate over the future of auDA – the organisation charged with managing the Internet domain name space here on behalf of the federal government – I was delighted to recently be invited to join its new Consultation Model Working Group.

auDA has drawn together a group of 16 members, which includes a broad range of people with knowledge and expertise in the running of the Internet in this country over many years.  Continue reading “auDA has great opportunity to reinforce its role in our digitally-enabled future, but needs to understand that disunity is death”

The 2018 Frank Walker Lecture: Populists, demagogues and celebrities – challenges for progressive campaigning in the age of Trump

By BRUCE HAWKER | 15 May 2018

If there is a common denominator to the reforms Frank Walker introduced it is that they were aimed at improving the lot of the men, women and children in our society who are least able to defend themselves – the dispossessed and marginalised minorities. The very people who Donald Trump targets, defames and demonises. In all my years in politics, I cannot recall another state politician with such a consistently strong record of empowering the powerless. And this conviction made Frank a difficult person for his own cabinet colleagues to handle. Continue reading “The 2018 Frank Walker Lecture: Populists, demagogues and celebrities – challenges for progressive campaigning in the age of Trump”

Will 5G replace Ethernet?

By TELCO SOLUTIONS | 20 March 2018

As we utilise mobile technology on a wider scale in the future, the need for faster and more reliable connectivity has never been so important. 5G is the next generation of wireless networking technology and, in short, promises to deliver ultra-fast speeds and responsiveness to connect everything around us without interruption. Continue reading “Will 5G replace Ethernet?”

Taking Smart City agenda to the regions could help Australia’s straining cities

By LAURIE PATTON | 9 November 2017

Among the issues considered at a recent Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat conference was how to deal with increasing urban density without destroying communities’ liveability, and how to increase people’s accessibility to their workplaces.

In The Fifth Estate’s report on the conference, it said: “By 2053, about 89 per cent of all Australians are expected to live in capital cities. As more and more people enter these cities, residents are becoming increasingly concerned with impacts on liveability”.

One of the solutions proposed was to build more public transport systems within cities, and specifically in the case of Sydney to continue the current trend for building new metros.

But does it makes sense for most of us to be jammed into a handful of overcrowded cities?
Continue reading “Taking Smart City agenda to the regions could help Australia’s straining cities”