Ignore driverless cars and we’re rejecting the future

By ANTHONY ALBANESE and ED HUSIC | 12 June 2018

The ever-accelerating pace of change in the 21st century demands that regulators be quick on their feet. Science and technology move so quickly that the moment we’ve settled the regulations governing the latest emerging sector, circumstances change, requiring that we revisit the regulatory framework.

For example, the Internet has developed so quickly over the past two decades that governments have failed to keep pace with emerging problems regarding privacy, bullying and cybercrime.

We should learn from this when it comes to the approach of what will be one of our biggest changes in decades: the emergence of automated vehicles. Continue reading “Ignore driverless cars and we’re rejecting the future”

Grumpy – The questions auDA dissidents won’t answer

By LAURIE PATTON | 6 June 2018

As I’ve previously written, auDA – the company managing Australia’s Internet domain names – is under attack from a group of dissident members known as the Grumpies.

Meanwhile auDA is undertaking a review process in order to meet a demand for reform after a report by the Department of Communications and the Arts found the organisation no longer fit-for-purpose.

Continue reading “Grumpy – The questions auDA dissidents won’t answer”

Community TV – needed now more than ever

By LAURIE PATTON | 3 June 2018

Last week the Government announced a further two year extension on its deadline for community television stations to vacate their free-to-air spectrum. The death knell first rang back in September 2014 when then communications minister Malcolm Turnbull announced that all CTV licences would end in December 2005. Since then the sector has limped on courtesy of a series of last minute reprieves.

Continue reading “Community TV – needed now more than ever”

Facts and fiction: More on the auDA situation

By LAURIE PATTON | 1 June 2018

As we approach the auDA Special General Meeting to be held on 27 July 2018 I decided to throw a few pertinent questions at CEO Cameron Boardman. As I’ve previously written, I simply can’t see how any further public displays of disunity are helping the situation, but it is also important that we decide the future of the organisation based on facts. Continue reading “Facts and fiction: More on the auDA situation”

auDA has great opportunity to reinforce its role in our digitally-enabled future, but needs to understand that disunity is death

By ANNE HURLEY | 27 May 2018

Having watched with interest the unfolding debate over the future of auDA – the organisation charged with managing the Internet domain name space here on behalf of the federal government – I was delighted to recently be invited to join its new Consultation Model Working Group.

auDA has drawn together a group of 16 members, which includes a broad range of people with knowledge and expertise in the running of the Internet in this country over many years.  Continue reading “auDA has great opportunity to reinforce its role in our digitally-enabled future, but needs to understand that disunity is death”

Consultation group to help reshape Internet domain names management

By LAURIE PATTON | 17 May 2018

With three months to develop new processes to redress historical weaknesses the company managing Australia’s Internet domain names has created a broad-based consultative group to guide the process.

This week saw the first meeting of what .au Domain Administration Limited, commonly known as auDA, calls its Consultation Model Working Group. auDA is the organisation charged with overseeing the Internet domain name space in Australia. If you have a website you’ll have dealt with one of the numerous companies that sell domain names to the public. They all operate under the authority and supervision of auDA.

Continue reading “Consultation group to help reshape Internet domain names management”

The 2018 Frank Walker Lecture: Populists, demagogues and celebrities – challenges for progressive campaigning in the age of Trump

By BRUCE HAWKER | 15 May 2018

If there is a common denominator to the reforms Frank Walker introduced it is that they were aimed at improving the lot of the men, women and children in our society who are least able to defend themselves – the dispossessed and marginalised minorities. The very people who Donald Trump targets, defames and demonises. In all my years in politics, I cannot recall another state politician with such a consistently strong record of empowering the powerless. And this conviction made Frank a difficult person for his own cabinet colleagues to handle. Continue reading “The 2018 Frank Walker Lecture: Populists, demagogues and celebrities – challenges for progressive campaigning in the age of Trump”

Bill Morrow slams the door and kicks the dog as he prepares to log off from his dud NBN

By LAURIE PATTON | 29 April 2018

The head of the trouble-plagued NBN, Bill Morrow, is departing. And he’s finally come clean conceding that reusing Telstra’s ageing copper wires is creating major problems.

In a paper published by NBN Co last week, Morrow admits that fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) is causing lower speeds and more dropouts than the fibre that was originally being rolled out. He also acknowledges that there are too many dissatisfied NBN customers. Continue reading “Bill Morrow slams the door and kicks the dog as he prepares to log off from his dud NBN”